Author Topic: Achieving the double V  (Read 3290 times)

TBM

  • Guest
Achieving the double V
« on: February 17, 2008, 02:42:00 pm »
I was at the trolling seminar yesterday and bought into the whole double V; a V down and a V front to back.  The presenters talked about the deepest lines going out first off the riggers then the dipseys running shallower and further back and then Core or copper off of inlines running shallower and further back yet again. I am new to all of this and I would like to try this! Would you only run this setup when you are trying to locate fish and once you find them you put everything at roughly the same depth? Would you run this double V all day?  What difference in depth do you typically try to achieve? I know the one presenter said when he runs multiple dipseys off of one side he tries to have a 30 foot difference in line out, my guess is you play with the dipseys to achieve specific depths as well ... he probably mentioned it but I missed it ... what depth difference would you try to achieve? Any other comments on what patterns people try to achieve In there spreads would be appreciated as well!


SpoonPullers.com

  • Advertisement
  • *****

CraigMacPhee

  • Guest
Achieving the double V
« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2008, 08:01:00 pm »
You should run this set up until you locate fish, then, target 5-10 foot above the fish you catch and 5-10 foot below.  Keep your higher lines on the inside of your spread and your deeper rods on the outside of your spread.  We run this sort of a V all day long but sometimes we pull rods if we really get into the fish so we can spin around easier and spend more time fishing where the fish are.

We know where our dipseys run (depth curve) and will let out enough line to be 5-10 feet above the fish on one side and 5-10 foot below the fish on the other side.  You have to have a high qualtiy graph (We use a Lowrance X111 and X113) and trust that fish are where they are marking.  If we are running our inside dipsey 150 foot back we will usually run our outside dipsey 200 foot back until we can zero in where the fish are liking it.

One thing I have learned over the past few years is that I like to catch my fish on purpose rather than a spray and pray style.  The old school of thought was if it was a 10 rod tournament you had to run 10 rods to catch as many fish as you could.  I was fortunate enough to have some great mentors here in Michigan who took me under their wing.  They taught me that if you run your spreads right, and where the fish are, you can get away with running as few as 4 rods if you run them right.  We have won numerous tournaments running 4 rods where we could have easily ran more.  Rather than running 10 miles in a straight line "scanning and praying" for fish, when we go over a school of lets say 10 fish, we will try to target the heck out of them and get all 10.  By running fewer rods you will be able to turn quicker and spend more time fishing where the fish are.

As far as the V pattern goes, we run an inverted V spread.  Our inside rigger rods are the highest and the outsides are the deepest.  Our inside dipsey rods are the highest and closest to the boat and the outside dipsey rods are the deepest and furthest back.

Our leadcore and copper will be the opposite in that the inside rods are the deepest and furthest back (for instance 10 colors) and the outside rods will be the shallowest and closest behind the board (for instance 2 colors)

Sorry for the novel but I wanted to try to give you all the information about this as I could. I know your question has been up for a few days with no response but now maybe others will add their advice as well.

steve

  • Guest
Achieving the double V
« Reply #2 on: February 22, 2008, 08:45:00 am »
i wish i could advise like Craig, but i dont have the experience....

i run a 17' boat, so i keep my spread to a simple level.

with that, i use the normal V pattern. My riggers are deepest, my inside wires are second deepest, then my outside dipsy or outside planer board/lead is the shallowest.

craig, using the inverted V, how do u get your deeper outside rods with a fish in....? I guess your reel your shallower, inside rods in?

CraigMacPhee

  • Guest
Achieving the double V
« Reply #3 on: February 22, 2008, 08:56:00 am »
Steve:

We almost never pull any lines to get another one in.  We rely on good hooks and heavier line than most.  

What will happen on your outside lines is as long as you keep your boat momentum going forward, the fish will naturally pull away from you and go the opposite direction.  Eventually they will work their way toward the surface clearing your other lines.  As the line tightens the fish will naturally drift behind your boat.  As long as you keep your speed up and boat somewhat straight you will be good most of the time.

What we will do when fighting a fish (in a tournament) is constantly have some man the wheel and that persons sole job is to watch where the fish is and what the rod man is doing.  The driver will continually try to keep the fish straight off the back of the boat by turning right or left so the fish is lined up as such.  

Looking at your question, I wanted to make sure you were clear that our furthest outside line (outside planer board) is usually our shallowest presentation.  Our inside planer board line is our deepest.  If you have them reversed you will get shiiiiit tangled in your turns.

patkirby

  • Guest
Achieving the double V
« Reply #4 on: February 22, 2008, 09:23:00 am »
We use that program as well Craig,  altough we call it the Flying Nun,, If you are old enough, you will see it looks like the Flying Nuns hat,,   If you are too young to remember,   Google it,,

Craigs is right with this guys, and landing the fish has as much to do with the driver of the boat as the person reeling in the fish..

Great info Craig

steve

  • Guest
Achieving the double V
« Reply #5 on: February 22, 2008, 09:30:00 am »
thanks craig and pat.

Gman

  • Guest
Achieving the double V
« Reply #6 on: February 24, 2008, 08:05:00 pm »
Great read Craig, thanks for being so detailed.

I also believe at times less lines is more.
I believe you can have too many lines and spook the fish to the point it can and will shut your spread down.

Thoughts?

Cheers
G.

CraigMacPhee

  • Guest
Achieving the double V
« Reply #7 on: February 25, 2008, 01:11:00 pm »
This is true to a point.  If you spread your lures out through different presentations, there is no way you will overload one area.  

However, if you drop 5 riggers down to one depth, drop 2 pound balls down to the same depth, and then put your dipseys there too, you may screw yourself.

They way to spread them out is by using riggers, dipseys, boards, long lines, etc.....  This way you can target a specific depth if you want but it can be over a section of water 200 foot or more wide.

TBM

  • Guest
Achieving the double V
« Reply #8 on: February 25, 2008, 01:36:00 pm »
Thanks Craig!

I only have a small boat and usually fish with my 2 sons so my typical spread would only be 6 rods, on occasion they might bring a friend but even then I am still so new at all of this that I don't think I would be brave enought to put the extra 2 lines in. I appreciate  your comments and the detail you went into! Also thanks for getting the ball rolling ... I have borrowed a copy the book you mentioned "Keating on Kings" and I will try to use the information it contains as a tool to help me approach trolling more methodically.

George

steelchaser

  • Guest
Achieving the double V
« Reply #9 on: February 25, 2008, 03:58:00 pm »
Now thats why I like this board so much, ask a question and eventually someone will answer. Thanks for getting the ball rolling on this Craig, good read and valuable info.